The “Year of the Linux Desktop” has become a meme at this point, one that is used most often sarcastically. Yet there are still a lot of people who deeply hold onto it and think that if only Linux had a good abstraction engine for package manager backends, those Windows users will be running Fedora in no time.

What we’re seeing is undoubtedly a cultural clash by two polar opposites that coexist in the Linux community. We can see it in action through the vitriol against Red Hat developers, and conversely the derision against Gentoo users on part of Lennart Poettering, Greg K-H and others. Though it appears in this case “Gentoo user” is meant as a metonym for Linux users whose needs fall outside the mainstream application set. Theo de Raadt infamously quipped that Linux is “for people who hate Microsoft”, but that quote is starting to appear outdated.

I really like Java

I am glad to have had the experience of programming in Java. I liked programming in Java mainly because I found it very relaxing. With a bad language, like say Fortran or csh, you struggle to do anything at all, and the language fights with you every step of the way forward. With a good language there is a different kind of struggle, to take advantage of the language’s strengths, to get the maximum amount of functionality, and to achieve the clearest possible expression.

Java is neither a good nor a bad language. It is a mediocre language, and there is no struggle. In Haskell or even in Perl you are always worrying about whether you are doing something in the cleanest and the best way. In Java, you can forget about doing it in the cleanest or the best way, because that is impossible. Whatever you do, however hard you try, the code will come out mediocre, verbose, redundant, and bloated, and the only thing you can do is relax and keep turning the crank until the necessary amount of code has come out of the spout. If it takes ten times as much code as it would to program in Haskell, that is all right, because the IDE will generate half of it for you, and you are still being paid to write the other half.

I resolve to recognize that a complaint reveals more about the complainer than the complained-about. Authority is won not by rants but by experience and insight, which require practice and imagination. And maybe some programming.

(If that’s good enough for Rob Pike, it’s good enough for you!)

The interesting thing about cloud computing is that we’ve redefined cloud computing to include everything that we already do. I can’t think of anything that isn’t cloud computing with all of these announcements. The computer industry is the only industry that is more fashion-driven than women’s fashion. Maybe I’m an idiot, but I have no idea what anyone is talking about. What is it? It’s complete gibberish. It’s insane. When is this idiocy going to stop?

http://www.cnet.com/news/oracles-ellison-nails-cloud-computing/

(of course, he seems to have changed his mind about it now :P)

These things aren’t true because we don’t care and don’t try to stop them, they’re true because everything is broken because there’s no good code and everybody’s just trying to keep it running. That’s your job if you work with the internet: hoping the last thing you wrote is good enough to survive for a few hours so you can eat dinner and catch a nap.

The idea of a formal design discipline is often rejected on account of vague cultural/philosophical condemnations such as “stifling creativity”; this is more pronounced in the Anglo-Saxon world where a romantic vision of “the humanities” in fact idealizes technical incompetence. Another aspect of that same trait is the cult of iterative design.

Djikstra